What’s in it for Me? Motivating Your Learners

People have talked about the WIIFM (“What’s in it for me?”) factor in educational theory for decades. It’s the idea that is if people know what benefits training has for them personally, they’ll be more invested. It’s easy to simply insert a sales pitch at the beginning of your course and consider your WIIFM quota met. Motivation is more complex than that. Let’s take a look at what motivation is, and how we can build it into training.

Read more over at GLAD solutions.

Five Tips for Choosing Fonts for Elearning

Explore behind the drop down menu on any of the big name content creation applications and you’ll find hundreds of fonts in all shapes and sizes. How do you find one that is perfect for your elearning project? Which one will deliver information clearly to your learners, while also contributing to an engaging design? Here are five tips for matchmaking fonts for your project.

Read more on my blog over at GLAD Solutions!

#ELH Challenge 177 + Tooltip Template

Another week, another excellent Elearning Challenge, this time on tooltips, hyperlinks and explorable explanations.

The term “tooltip” originally comes from the early days of applications like Microsoft Word and Paint, where users were greeted by toolbars full of unfamiliar icons. Although the FUN way to work out what everything did was to try every button out, the quickest way was to hover your cursor over the item. A small hover box would appear giving you information about that item without you having to try it out.

(I’m using past tense, but of course tooltips are still everwhere! )

Tooltips in Photoshop, 2017

Tooltips in Photoshop, 2017

For this week’s challenge I decided to take a passage from an encyclopedia and add in tooltips to provide nuggets of additional information.  With websites like Wikipedia I’ll often find myself getting lost as I branch down different pages. One moment I’m reading about the Royal Albert Hall, a few hyperlinks later and I’m reading about the island of Grenada (…it’s true!) With tooltips, it’s easy to get small nuggets of information which add to understanding without taking you too far away from the original topic.

Here’s my example which is all about the mysterious Mechanical Turk, a bizarre and fascinating episode in the history of computer programming:

mechanical turk.jpg

Get the Template

If you’re interested in taking a peek at the Storyline 2 file and adapting it for your own purposes, I’ve created a template which you can download here.

The future of tooltips?

The big problem with tooltips, of course, is that you classically need to be able to hover a cursor to use them – something you can’t really do if you are using a touch screen. It’ll be interesting to see what happens to tooltips and hovering interactions in general in the future. Are they on their way out?

If you’ve enjoyed this or found it useful, do let me know in the comments and find me on Twitter and LinkedIn! 

 

Cells – Now with More Words!

A couple of weeks ago I took part in ELH Challenge #176, creating a course about cells which only used the 100 most frequently used words in the English language.

I liked it so much that I thought I should probably create a version which uses actual terminology, so here it is!

I’ve tried at aim it at an early secondary school age group, since that was when I remember having to learn about cells at this kind of level.

cellsimage3

CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE DEMO

Animated Timer Farm Quiz- Elearning Challenge #150

Here’s a quiz with a twist – can you answer the questions before the tractor makes its way across the screen and drops all of its hay bales?

The farm game

Try the demo here.

This piece was inspired by Ridvan Saglam’s creative timers, and I made it in Storyline 2 in response to Elearning Heroes Animated Countdown challenge!

The quiz questions are sourced from Letham Shank Farm, which has a fantastically comprehensive website with a passion for agriculture which is infectious!

Stories: A Powerful Elearning Tool

How are you doing with your Summer reading list? I’m currently binge reading lots of old childhood favourites. I’m surprised by how dark Peter Pan is, coming to it as an adult!

Stories aren’t just kids stuff, however. They’re powerful didactic tools which reach across time, space, culture and age. I’ve been using them more and more for corporate clients as part of scenarios, to create engagement and make the real-world applications of learning clear.

I wrote a blog a while ago about stories in elearning, and why they’re so important for creating engaging. Perhaps you can add it to your Summer reading!