Elearning Theory

Spaced Learning: Applications in Elearning

It’s late. The test is tomorrow. You have a stack of textbooks on your desk and 12 hours to somehow transfer the information within them into your brain. What could go wrong?

It’s an experience that too many of us can relate to from our days at school. Unfortunately, we probably also relate to the usual consequence – the information you gained from cramming quickly disappears. Best case scenario: after the test. Worst case scenario, you’ll forget as you walk in to take the test. The problem transfers to elearning, where learners often feel like they have retained information long enough to make it through the experience, before having it vanish into the ether of other things which preoccupy our minds. We might be able to tackle this problem with the concept of spaced learning

Read more over at my blog at Glad Solutions!

Elearning Theory

Elearning and Soft Skills Training

We all know that the best employees aren’t company-policy quoting automata.

A good worker also needs to be able to implement their knowledge in an open ended and complex world. You can’t train for every possible scenario, and so people must have the skills to adapt. That’s why the concept of “soft skills” is increasingly important to employers.

Read more on my blog over at GLAD Solutions!

Elearning Theory

Do Learning Styles Exist?

When I was 12, my school made me fill out a form purporting to be able to tell me my learning styles. Apparently, I was either an auditory, visual or kinaesthetic learner. My teacher said that how you learn and revise should be different, depending on the form’s conclusions. An auditory learner might create a revision song while a kinaesthetic learner might count on their fingers.

My sensible classmates ploughed through the test and got on with their lives, but I was feeling cantankerous. I didn’t want some stupid label. It seemed silly. I could see myself learning in all three ways. In protest, I spent most of the lesson creating an information sheet on a new style of learning which I called oditory learning. An oditory learner, I decided, learned by smelling things.

I know, I know. I was a bit of a smartypants.

As an instructional designer, I still run into the concept of learning styles. But here’s a secret which shouldn’t be a secret: 12 year old me was right. The evidence behind learning styles is shaky at best, and could be a barrier to the creation of great learning.

Click here to read more over at GLAD Solutions.

Elearning Theory

Stories: A Powerful Elearning Tool

How are you doing with your Summer reading list? I’m currently binge reading lots of old childhood favourites. I’m surprised by how dark Peter Pan is, coming to it as an adult!

Stories aren’t just kids stuff, however. They’re powerful didactic tools which reach across time, space, culture and age. I’ve been using them more and more for corporate clients as part of scenarios, to create engagement and make the real-world applications of learning clear.

I wrote a blog a while ago about stories in elearning, and why they’re so important for creating engaging. Perhaps you can add it to your Summer reading!